Funnelocity Podcast

30 Days of Webinars with Emma Westley (S1, Ep1)

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Emma Westley, founder of immerj.io and CMO for the Invigorate platform, embarked on a 30 day deep investigation of the current state of B2B webinars. In this, our inaugural episode of Funnelocity, Enrico and Emma discuss the good, bad, and ugly of the over 40 webinars she attended, and Emma provides her top 5 insights for running a great webinar.

Enrico Brosio:

Hello, and welcome to Funnelocity, the B2B Sales and Marketing podcast. Each episode, we take a look at one or more aspects, tools, strategies, or tactics from the B2B world in the company of a special guest and ask questions such as does it work and could it be done differently? I’m Enrico Brosio president of MarketOne, and your host. In this episode, we address one of the most commonly used and now indispensable sales and marketing tools of recent times, the good old webinar. To help me dissect this topic, I’m delighted to welcome Emma Westley. Emma is senior marketing demand gen and content pro with over 15 years’ experience in the B2B tech industry, including a stint at MarketOne. She’s worked with the likes of HP, Symantec, Barclaycard, as well as a number of tech startups in the UK and across Europe, helping them translate their business goals into achievable and scalable marketing and content strategies. Emma is also founder of immerj.io, a content planning tool that helps teams get started with content strategy in minutes. Most importantly, Emma has recently completed an epic challenge having spent 30 days attending no less than 42 webinars. So I think it’s safe to say she’s qualified to speak on today’s subject. Welcome Emma.

Emma Westley:

Hi Enrico. Thanks for having me and thanks for that intro.

Enrico:

Excellent. Well, listen before we dig into why you dedicated so much of your time to webinars, I’d love to hear a bit more about immerj and what drove you to set up that company.

Emma:

Sure. So, immerj is basically a content strategy solution. The main part of it is a plumbing tool. It’s an interactive tool that can help plan your content strategy and work out two main things. So first of all, what  content types to do, and secondly, how to promote that content. So it’s a visual interactive tool to drag and drop interface, which is obviously great at the moment for remote working, because it helps with sharing, a bit like an interactive online whiteboard would do. It really came about from, I’ve been working over the past few years with a lot of startups, tech startups, and a lot of them are unsure of where to start with their content strategy and unsure know how to get going with it. In my consulting role in my freelance work, I do a lot of that, but this tool is actually a product of helping visualize the content strategy. And so it really just helps companies get to grips with their content strategies, get a strategy up and going in a few minutes and then get onto the more important stuff of actually executing and creating the content.

Enrico:

Oh, fantastic. Certainly sounds like it’s the perfect tool for these times when we are trying to engage much more online, digitally, we need more content. I know that we, as an agency are doing it for ourselves a lot more than we have in past, and certainly our clients. It sounds exciting. We’ll have to keep an eye on how that evolves.

Emma:

Yeah. So I’ve got lots of ideas for it, so yeah, where it goes next we shall see.

Enrico:

Well, best of luck on that. So, well, let’s turn then to today’s topic. I guess my first question is really, it’s about a curiosity now, and then just, I need to understand what led you to spend 30 days attending webinars. I mean, most people, , were worried more about stockpiling or binge watching the next thing, , and here you are diving deep into webinars. How did that come about?

Emma:

So maybe it was my, my form of madness for, for 2020 is what COVID did to me. So I suppose it was a direct result of COVID and lockdown. Obviously a lot more events were going online and there was this explosion of webinars just happening. We’ve now all become great users of the term ‘zoom fatigue’. And a lot of people are potentially getting tired of online events. But earlier on, in lockdown, I was obviously watching a few of these and , saying, ‘Oh, , that one looks great or that one looks really interesting. I’ll, I’ll attend a few of these’. And so I did, I attended a few and, as you mentioned in the intro, I’ve been in marketing for over 15 years and I was thinking all these haven’t really changed much in the span of my career.

I was watching them and thinking, ‘Hmm, this is a bit disappointing’. So I thought, well, surely there must be companies out there that are doing them better or, worse. Surely there must be best practices that we can all learn from because obviously there’s going to be more and more companies doing them. So, what are the best practices we can follow? And so I was chatting with an ex-colleague and we came up with this idea of, well, let’s do a 30 day webinar challenge. That ex colleague challenged me to do it. They didn’t want anything to do with it. So they just said, ‘Oh, you do it’. So I thought actually, yeah, this is a good idea, and it went from there, but basically it was to try and find a little bit more inspiration and innovation.

Enrico:

That’s great. And obviously it comes at a perfect time where companies are desperate to engage with their customers, with their prospects and making that shift. We’ve sure read in the press, that the pandemic has really accelerated digital transformation. And in so many ways, it’s really what we’re talking about now, is it’s about this pivot from physical events to online events, webinars, summits, et cetera, et cetera. And we’ve certainly over the last few months helped clients build dozens, if not hundreds, of these types of programs, digital programs as they make that pivot. So, I’m sure they’d be listening very keenly today on this podcast to understand what are some of the best practices. But before we go into the findings, could you share with us the format of this 30 day project that you took on. How did you approach it? What would you be looking for? And then we’ll go into next what you actually found.

Emma:

Yeah. So it was, the prep was all around June, and the idea was do one webinar a day. Obviously I was doing my day job and thought, right, I don’t want to give myself too many extra things to do. It ended up being 42 webinars. That was definitely the madness setting in thinking, , I was seeing all these invites come in and going, ‘Oh, that looks interesting. And that one, it looks good.’ And so got a bit carried away. I knew that I was going to be publishing some  content off the back of it. So I decided to try it. I’m going to focus on things that will be interesting for me, first of all, so that it would keep hold of my interests, but also for my network. So I focused on topics like marketing, data, startups, tech, women in tech, all those sorts of topics.

Then I started off researching things like Eventbrite, Meetup, BrightTalk, , going through those sorts of platforms to find ones that were interesting. I also asked my network, I said, anybody got any interesting webinars coming up? Then I started to  put together the schedule. And as I said, it turned into more than one a day, 42 in total across all those different topics and things. And as I said before, the main thing I was looking for was really not just best practices, but also things that were being done differently. I was getting really bored with the format of 30, 40 minutes slides, then a Q and A, very often disguised product pitches from vendors. I was looking for companies, people who were doing them differently, doing innovative or novel things, using novel tools as well. And yeah, trying to find different ways of doing that as opposed to the standard old school format.

Enrico:

There’s a lot that goes into, I guess, the production of webinars. So when you were kind of putting your analytical hat on, how did you break it down? What were the different components that you were trying to analyze of a webinar experience? If I can call it that?

Emma:

Yeah. So there was obviously the registration process. What was that like and how was that process promoted as well? So how were you actually finding out about the webinars? So then what was the buildup once I’d registered, what was the, what were the  hooks that were getting me bought into it? They were actually going to make me attend? I’ll be honest. There were ones that, that I registered for and then I felt, , well, they haven’t done a very good job of inspiring me, so I might not attend or I’ll just listen back to the recording or something. So that was all part of the learning process for saying, , what  build up was being done well and not, not so well then there was obviously the webinar itself, , who were the presenters?

How did they present? What was the content? What tools were they using through through the webinar? And I don’t mean just the software, but also other tools that were being interjected? And then after the webinar experience, what was the follow up, how did they deal with the recording? Was there anything different that was done with the recording and how were they they , we talked about  sweating content or atomizing it, how were they repurposing it afterwards? And then obviously the follow on from that, which I’ll get into an example later on of what not to do I suppose, with how you follow up from these sorts of things. So yeah, it was those sorts of buckets of, , build up, actual webinar, and then follow up as well.

Enrico:

That’s great. So breaking it down into registration, the pre webinar kind of build up your webinar itself, post webinar, and then perhaps even longer term. So kind of those five stages almost. Well, so what did you find and, did this experience live up to your expectations?

Emma:

I have to say I was quite disappointed apart from a few companies or individuals that did things little bit differently. I think I came away generally very disappointed and thinking we really need to do something about this, especially if this is to continue we need to shake this up because it was like stepping back in time a little bit. I’ve got to cut people some slack this year, , we’ve all had difficult times. So, but there was this default of right, it’s 30 to 40 minute slides, Q and A , the buildup was just your automated emails here at, , here’s a reminder for tomorrow’s webinar, that  thing. And then the follow up was the standard  ‘thanks for attending here’s the recording’. So a lot of them did fall into that camp, unfortunately.

Enrico:

Not very inspirational, I guess. So, well, let’s get into the nitty gritty here. So maybe let’s start with where things perhaps went wrong. If you can give us some examples of what not to do when setting up or running a webinar.

Emma:

So I’d say that what not to do fell into three camps aligned to those five buckets we were talking about a minute ago. So first of all, the buildup, definitely just don’t rely on those automated emails, the software tool emails. They’re the same as what everybody else does so show a little bit of inspiration and do something differently with them. Then there was the actual content itself. So, make sure you spend time on that content, get good presenters, think about who your audience is. Don’t disguise it as a product pitch. Don’t structure your title as how to do X, Y, Z, and then the webinar is basically just a product demo or a glorified bio of somebody. And yeah, then the follow up as well is again, understanding your audience and sending them useful content, interesting resources after the webinar that they can use. I’ve gone into a lot more detail on this, on my blog, which is on immerj.io. I won’t name and shame everybody here, but I will call out to companies because they should know better about this stuff.

Enrico:

Come on. Let’s hear it.

Emma:

So Salesforce, you would think they would do it better. And to be fair, the actual webinar itself wasn’t too bad, but as soon as I registered…the whole experience around the webinar was one that I’ve would not, put as a best practice. So as soon as I registered for the webinar, and it was a topical webinar, it wasn’t to do with the product. But as soon as I registered for it, I had an email like two minutes later from a sales person at Salesforce saying, ‘Oh, we noticed that you registered for this webinar. Would you like a demo of…’  Well, no, I don’t really want a demo. I registered for this topical webinar for ideas and I’m not interested in the product. So I, I plainly responded with that. And two minutes later I got another email back saying, well, that’s fine, but actually we’re coming up to the end of our quarter and we’ve got some really good deals on this product…

And that just completely turned me off. Knowing that the sorts of things that go into these, the back ends of these digital journeys, they obviously have their lead scoring set up completely incorrectly that, registering for this webinar equals X amount of points and so get funneled through to the sales person about a product. So that was not a great experience.

Enrico:

Sorry, can I just, I’ve got a question there because obviously in this day and age, sales reps are looking for any way to engage with customers and prospects that are engaging with them. So I think your point resonates really well, which is, hey, this is a top, let’s call it a top of funnel thought leadership type webinar. If I think of it from like where am I in my journey, I’m very much at the building awareness and research gathering perhaps and not necessarily in this evaluation stage which is, again, I guess that begs the question is, are there certain webinars where a well-placed call pre webinar from a sales rep I think would have been okay, , in your mind, and I guess you were saying if it was a demo type webinar, but are there other types of examples of where, what if was a case study, right?

Emma:

Yeah, exactly. And I think that would be one of the learnings from this, is really understand where in your funnel or your journey, you’re positioning this webinar because yeah, if it’s top of funnel, then don’t do your follow up, which is a hard sales push. Equally, if it is designed for, even for existing customers, then yeah. A product demo might be better or, showing existing customers different features of an existing product or yeah, sharing a case study, people that are more interested in that at that stage of their journey, they’re more interested in potentially having a sales call. So that’s definitely one of the learnings is understand where in the journey you’re pitching the webinar and make sure you’ve got the right people on the webinar, if that’s what your follow up is going to be. Because, this follow up in particular was obviously not gauging correctly where I’d come from, or what interest I had in the in the webinar at all.

Enrico:

And where you were in that, in that customer journey. Yeah. So, okay. So that’s one example, I guess this could be the Salesforce example. You mentioned a second.

Emma:

Yeah. So I suppose this is related quite similarly to the overall experience that you go through. And so the other one that was a real, as I put in my, in my blog there, the rotten tomato was BrightTALK, unfortunately. Not so much because of the actual webinars, because they’re a platform for other vendors and companies to promote their own webinars and use their software. But it was more, the experience of signing up to one webinar then got me into this, like mass of emails being sent to me.

Enrico:

All of a sudden you’re opted in to everything.

Emma:

Yeah, exactly. And I think I spent the best part of every day for two or three weeks after that, unsubscribing from different emails from BrightTALK. And I couldn’t find out how to unsubscribe from them all. Couldn’t work that out.

Enrico:

There was no preference center? Right. Interesting, interesting.

Emma:

And it was just, again, a bad experience. And then I was getting emails about ones that were just not, not of interest at all, not related. So again, not their actual webinar, but just that, saying the webinar is part of an overall experience in a real digital journey.

Enrico:

Right. Well then who, who got it right? What are some examples of, either full experiences that really were great or had elements of the webinar experience that you thought were handled really well?

Emma:

Well, one company stood out in all of this and that was Turtl. So I’m sure a lot of people listening will know Turtl – they’re a content marketing software company themselves. And, but the way they did their webinars was, was very different. It was, they had broken it down and they called it like a coffee chat series or something, and they’d broken it down into 30 minute sessions each week on different topics. And the content itself was great. It was very natural. There were two people presenting and it was very  organic and natural albeit with quite a lot of prepared content as well. Their buildup was great. It included little videos in the emails of the two people, there was one of them that was doing a remote high five over three screens. They used a lot of great tools in the actual webinar.

Enrico:

These are the presenters that would then be speaking. So then you’re getting snippets of who they are and you’re almost building up a personality.

Emma:

Exactly. Yeah, and that, that came through in a, in a few other webinars . One example was actually including video content in the buildup. So maybe a little snippet from one of the presenters to say, ‘Oh, this is what we’ll be talking about’, or ‘here’s what you can look forward to’. So that was a theme actually was the video, the video content. And then the other thing that Turtl did really well and the other companies did well was using polls or interactive things on the webinars themselves. So getting your audience engaged. This is a tricky one because there were other ones that I attended where there were even things like breakout sessions. There was one I attended, which was quite funny that as soon as they mentioned that there was a breakout session loads of people then left the webinar, because they weren’t prepared for it. So I think you have to be careful with high interactive, you make it.

Enrico:

So that’s interesting because I’m about to join a summit next week. And I’m expecting that, that to happen, I’m hopeful that that will happen, but I guess your point, was this a webinar, was it branded as a webinar, or is this as a summit and kind of more of a larger type of trade show, if you will.

Emma:

Yeah. Well, it was a webinar, but I think they hadn’t really advertised it then in the build up to say this would happen. So if you’re expecting to just come on and watch content for, 30 or 40 minutes, and then you’re “Surprise, we’re going to put you in breakout sessions…”

Enrico:

And likely multitasking, right?

Emma:

Yes, exactly. Yeah. Or, especially at the moment, if you’re sat in your pajamas or haven’t done your hair and yeah, you then sprung with you’ve got to get on video and network with people. So just again, set expectations, and know your audience. But that said, there are lots of things that you can do, fun stuff that doesn’t always require networking or breakout sessions. One of the really funny things that I came across was, and this is in the blog as well, was goat bombing tool. So you would pay or log for a goat to bomb your webinar at some stage when you were, when you were hosting. It’s just a silly little thing. It doesn’t have anything to do with the actual, topics or anything, but it was a fun thing. It just breaks it up. And especially for right now as we have all got zoom fatigue at the moment, it’s doing the little things like that can make a difference.

Enrico:

Absolutely. Getting, get people engaged. So again, I think it’s what I’m hearing is those that did it well, at least what you’re calling out for Turtl is, it’s relevant, they’re engaging and they’re setting expectations.

Emma:

Yeah. Yeah. And I think it goes back to the most fundamental thing and not just in webinars, but all marketing, is know your audience. Know what content they’re interested in, how you want to address that, what challenges they’re having that you can help with and, work your content around that and, your buildup and your follow up around that as well.

Enrico:

Any other examples of companies that did it well?

Emma:

Yeah, I think there are other ones that that did it, well, would have been, there was a marketing meetup which is like a meetup networking thing. They had a couple of people on one from Content Cal, which is a social media calendaring software. And I think it was an agency called Purple Goat. I think that was the other, the other one. And that was another great one. Again, the build up was great because it was, it was novel, the emails, the emails that they were sending beforehand were quite fun and different, not just the automated ones. And then the actual content itself was interesting. They coupled a bit of work stuff with some personal stories as well. That was nice. And then again, the follow up was engaging and fun.

Enrico:

So Emma, earlier you mentioned that you received a call where it wasn’t relevant. They were trying to sell you at a point at a time that just wasn’t relevant to you. You were much further up, top of funnel kind of just ideas gathering. Is there a, on the follow up, a post-event follow up, is there a place for a phone call?

Emma:

Hmm. I think this goes back to understanding where your webinar is in that journey. So if it is more top of funnel then a phone call is probably not, not the right thing to do, unless it’s more gathering research or understanding, like, did you find the webinar useful? Did you get out of it what you wanted to, as long as it’s that, research gathering or, again, very top of funnel prospects. That said, though, I think a phone call straight after a webinar, or even a couple of touches after webinars is a bit much, because , a phone call, a lot of people could find quite intrusive. I think, yeah, if you’re going to do that more human touch keep it for your middle of funnel, your or your bottom of funnel when the customer is engaged or engaged with other areas of content.

So they’re looking at other articles or case studies or products, content definitely, understand where it is that, that you want to do that. I think if it’s webinars that are more top of funnel, the follow up, I found actually LinkedIn did quite a good job with this. Off the back of their webinar that I attended was just sending, first of all, the content that’s relevant to the webinar that you’ve just attended and maybe like a tool. So they sent a couple of templates that you could use in planning like a LinkedIn marketing campaign or something. So it was related to the webinar. It was useful content that you could actually use after you’d attended the webinar. And it was adding value to that relationship without being too pushy. So yeah, that was a good example. There was another example of one that I did attend, which was related to chatbots and it was how do you turn your FAQ content into chatbot material. And they did a small demo of the actual product on the webinar. And that one you could see afterwards that maybe is better fitted with a human touch afterwards.

Enrico:

Because it was product because it was product specific. Are there examples then, and at one point I do want to get your top tips and takeaways, but I’m curious to hear a bit more about the post event, post webinar, follow up or nurtures. What are your thoughts there and what works and what doesn’t work post event?

Emma:

So I think the easiest way to put this is to put yourself in the position of the customer and think, what would you be happy with after attending a webinar? If what you’re doing feels too pushy for you, then don’t do it. It’s understanding where in the journey your customer is and where are your webinars targeted and then doing the nurture or the follow up based off of that. The best ones were ones that  did a couple of touches, a couple of follow ups afterwards and say, with useful content or tools, or, here’s an article you might be interested in, or here’s a another webinar that we we’re doing that that’s related and then it stopped. It wasn’t this constant, you weren’t funneled into like a 10 step follow up or something.

Enrico:

Right, into perpetuity. It was, it was maybe just a one, two, three, and then stop.

Emma:

Yeah. Because it’s better that you, as a customer, you come away with a good feeling of that brand and of that, if it is, it is product related. If you’re going to keep hammering someone with constant emails after they’ve attended a webinar, that’s going to give them a bad impression of your brand. And so you might think you’re doing a good job and doing the follow up, but you’re really pestering them. You’re starting to spam them. So I would keep it short, relevant, useful and let them go away with that good feeling and that good impression of your brand and your company.

Enrico:

Exactly. And then I just connecting the dots from what you said earlier, and of course, if there are engaging with your website with other content, all of a sudden that leads score goes up and then absolutely. Maybe there it is time for a well-placed timely call to be made. So what about, we haven’t spoken about the non-attendees. I mean, a lot of the, I don’t know what the percentages of, I presume half of the people that probably register for a webinar, wouldn’t want attend. What about, what about that segment, if you will. Any thoughts about how to approach those prospects?

Emma:

Mm. So first of all, to avoid that really maximize your buildup so that you are driving attendance. A lot of webinars, a lot of virtual events work fast and in a live format when you watch back a lot of the recordings, you kind of lose the effect of some of the polls or the interactivity that’s happening. So do that work beforehand to maximize and, engage people with video content or whatever, and get them there on the day. For those that don’t attend – and I think, yeah, I think that the stats are about 50%, it’s the same with live events, you’ll get about a 50% drop off. One that I attended that did do something interesting was they didn’t offer a recording and the person that ran it basically followed up afterwards and said, ‘I’m sorry, you can attend. Please know, we’re not doing a recording of this because X, Y, Z and, if you want, if you missed it, then we’re going to rerun it again next week.’ So it was quite an interesting  tactic that consciously deciding we’re not doing a recording of this. But we’re going to rerun the event itself. That, I can see the pros and cons of that. On demand stuff is quite powerful as we know, we all consume a lot of on demand. But the one thing that I would challenge companies and marketing teams today is just, don’t just do a recording and send it out. Think about how you can package it up a little bit better even if you wanted to repurpose the content. So do it as a summary version as, here’s the top 10 takeaways that we learned from this.

Maybe even, I have not seen this done anywhere, but I’d love to see it. Would be like a mash up version of the recording. So sound bites, edited out and then put together in like a five minutes flights. And then putting some nice animation or something around it. Almost it as a bit of an Instagram version of your recording where you’re highlighting bits or adding animation.

Enrico:

A highlights reel is really clever. I’m not sure I’ve actually seen that done, but that would be great if you’ve signed up to, let’s say a 45-minute webinar, but you only have five or 10 minutes. It would be great to get that. It’s kind of like right now, it’s the French Tennis Open right now, and I’m binge watching the highlight reels for a few minutes, and it’s kind of that. I don’t have time to watch the entire match, but give you the highlights.

Emma:

Yeah, exactly. That is definitely an area that I think could do with a lot of work, is that recording. Then just repurposing the content as well. Like, turn it into different forms. Because not everybody has the time or the inclination to watch back. Yeah. I feel during full recordings people are likely going to be multitasking at the same time.

Enrico:

Yeah. And I think you’ll probably get a lot more quote, unquote clicks and engagement here, your engagement score probably go up. If you had that highlights reel. It’s less daunting, people click on it because they see it’s just five or 10 minutes and not 45 minutes. So it’s interesting, really interesting. Well, Emma, this has been super interesting and I wanted to ask, where do you see this going as a way to distribute content? So the online webinar, obviously with COVID and the pandemic we’re in, it’s really one of the very few forms that sales and marketing can work together to drive engagement. And in fact, we recently did a survey of B2B marketers across North America where, they talk about kind of focusing on tactics that actually have demonstrable benefits if you will, from a sales and marketing perspective. And certainly this is one of them. So where do you see this going? Do you have a sense of, have we reached the peak, or is it just the tip of the iceberg? And this is actually going to explode now with maybe a lot of innovation happening?

Emma:

Yeah. I don’t think we’ve reached peak webinar or anything like that because even the odd one that I still attend even after this challenge, the attendance numbers are good. There are a lot of people still attending webinars. And even the bigger virtual conferences we’ve started to see come through. I think that companies have realized we’re not going to get back to face to face stuff anytime soon. So how do we turn a five-day conference into a virtual version? I think there’s a lot of work we still need to do on them though. Making them a lot more innovative, a lot more creative, funneling that creative thought into how do we do them differently. I’ve seen some interesting tools and things cropping up around things like virtual reality. There’s an interesting company called Spatial who do like 3D avatar events, that thing. Obviously it’s not a hundred percent accessible at the moment for everybody, not everyone has the headsets that they need or the home setups that you need to attend these sorts of things. So if we can find somewhere in the middle ground where it’s very interactive, it’s capturing that natural aspect that you get at a face to face event.

Enrico:

The one you mentioned was the white boarding, which I thought was really cool.

Emma:

Yeah. It was actually in the challenge. I forgot but there was one guy that I know personally actually, and his webinars are basically all white boarding sessions. So he doesn’t do slides. He just gets on mainly YouTube or Facebook videos and he’ll whiteboard. Obviously a lot of us have to come become a lot more comfortable with that sort of thing.

Enrico:

I can see how that’s engaging though. I really like that as a technique. I think it’s a skill that you have to develop if you’re the person delivering it.

Emma:

Yeah. But yeah. Step away from the slides, please.

Enrico:

Exactly. Make it more human. Yeah. Wow. Well, again, this has been super, super insightful and I guess as a wrap up, my last question is what are Emma’s top tips for anyone looking to create a webinar?

Emma:

Hmm. Yeah, I think we’ve covered pretty much all of them, but I’d sum up in five top tips. Very easily, very clearly know your audience. That’s the biggest one, not just for webinars, for all sorts of marketing. Know what challenges you’re trying to address. Connected to that is the second one of, know the funnel stage or the journey stage. So your experience around it is correct, and right for the customer. Spend time on your content. Don’t just do slides, be a little bit more innovative, think about other things that you can do, like goats or polls, or interactive stuff. Yeah, just be a little bit more creative, even if it goes wrong, at least it’s more natural, it’s fun, and people will remember it a bit better. Number four would be the before and after again, just using that opportunity to engage with people, definitely using video content. That’s such an easy win before and after. Again, it doesn’t have to be polished. It can be just off the cuff natural stuff. And then the fifth one again, think about your recording and how you’re distributing that. And through all of this, it’s all about making your content work as hard as it can. I’ve talked a couple of times about repurposing content and if you’re doing those things all along that process of building and promoting a webinar, you’ve then got a lot more content that you can use. And it’s not just a one-off thing, and then it goes in the drawer and you forget about it.

Enrico:

Wonderful. That’s fantastic. Well, thank you for a very fascinating and enlightening discussion today, and some really down to earth tips on what to do on webinars. I must admit I’ve attended many webinars and online events over the years. I thought I was a pretty seasoned viewer and knowledgeable on the topic, but thanks to you, Emma, I know a lot more today, so thanks. Thanks for joining us Emma, on Funnelocity.

Emma:

No problem. Thanks very much for having my and I hope that 2021 brings us a lot more innovative webinars and virtual events.

Enrico:

Here, here, and many thanks to our listeners for joining in on today’s episode of Funnelocity. To learn more about MarketOne and discover further episodes, or even the B2B marketing survey that we ran recently, please visit MarketOne.com/Funnelocity. Thank you.